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Sunday, February 9, 2014

A Woman's Worth. Part 2





In an oversexed society, one challenge I've faced in raising my daughters is convincing them of the value of their sexuality. How can I expect them to heed my suggestions on when, why and who they engage sexually with, when casual sex is commonplace in the media and among their friends. 
The teenagers in my daughter's school, are engaging in sexual activity before they even know what a menstrual is. Real life examples such as these threaten to ruin all the hard work I put into establishing sexual morals and ethics in my girls. 

And don't get me started with the boys (those of body and those of mind) that try to convince young ladies that giving up the cookie  "is not a big deal" and attempt to guilt their female comrades to engage because "everybody else is doing it".  Which brings me to the point of this installment of 'A Woman's Worth'. 

If giving up the cookie is not a big deal, why are their so many people lined up to stick their hands in the cookie jar? And if everybody is doing it and seeing it and showing it, why should that decrease it's value?

As Summer's Eve demonstrates in the advertisement above, one thing that adds to a woman's worth, is her sex (that may sound sexist, but it's a fact). Men fight for it; they are inspired by it; they build careers based on it (money, cars and nice houses draws cookie like light draws moths); they go to jail for it; they die for it; they sacrifice for it; I mean, the list goes on. 

Yoni is the source of life, it is inspiration for music and poetry and has been a subject of visual art for centuries. It has been a bargaining chip in times of war and it's required to maintain civilization. Some religions and cultures believe that it's essence can increase personal power and extend one's life span. It is the one thing that no matter how available it is, it never depreciates. So I teach my girls to take care of it, keep it clean and healthy and that instead of giving up the cookie to whoever asks, make sure they know that the one they share it with, is worthy.